Bettina Arndt

11/10/2011

 
I have this funny slogan – “Never too much information!” – which is all about trying to get people to talk openly about sex.  So many people miss out experiencing the true joys of making love because they are ignorant and embarrassed about what should be a natural part of life.

Bettina Arndt

It was sex that made Bettina Arndt famous. As one of Australia's first sex therapists and editor of Forum magazine, Bettina spent her early career talking and writing about sex through the media. Her frank approach sometimes landed her in hot water – including a two year ban from live TV and radio. A trained clinical psychologist, she taught medical students, doctors and other professionals and talked endlessly about this fascinating subject to audiences all over Australia and overseas. By the 1980s she'd had enough of a good thing. She gave up sex - professionally speaking - and moved onto writing for newspapers and magazines about broader social issues. But after nearly twenty years, she has returned to her first love, spreading the word about what goes on between the sheets.   

http://www.bettinaarndt.com.au/


Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Sydney

Caroline Kelly

23/8/2011

 
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Forty or fifty years ago, someone diagnosed with pancreatic cancer would most likely face death within months. Shockingly, in spite of all the advances by mankind, that is still the case in 2011. Too many lives have been lost to this disease and I want to do all that I can to help change that and give hope to those battling it.

Caroline Kelly

In the months after her husband’s diagnosis with pancreatic cancer, Caroline and Avner co-founded a fund to make a difference to those affected by one of the most lethal cancers. Sadly Avner, like 95% of patients diagnosed with this disease succumbed to it months later, a statistic that hasn’t really improved in the last 50 years. Caroline and her two co-directors, have continued to lead the foundation, passionately focused on improving the statistics and outcomes for patients. More than $1.7 million has been raised through charity walks and dinners, and through the support of companies such as Woolworths, Coca-Cola Amatil and Wellcom, as well as countless individuals and volunteers. This money has already funded a trial, is funding cutting edge research into sequencing the genes of pancreatic cancer and the next initiative is for a pilot into providing home nursing in the final nights of a patient’s life in their home. Caroline works full-time running the foundation in hope of improving the statistics for future generations.

http://www.avnersfund.org.au/

Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Sydney
 
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 We need to treat waste with the respect it deserves.

Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla

Veena grew up in Mumbai where, for reasons of poverty and need, Indians have created an economy that finds ways to extract value from waste. Aided by her background, education and research, which ranged from witnessing the recycling of waste into everyday life in Mumbai to her PhD in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Michigan, Veena has won numerous awards for her invention which incorporates waste plastics as a carbon source for steelmaking. In 2005 she received Australian Museum Eureka Prizes for Scientific Research. In 2011 Veena won the prestigous Pravasi Bharatiya Samman Award given by the President of India in acknowledgement of her outstanding achievement in the field of science and in recognition of her valuable contribution in promoting the honour and prestige of India and in fostering the interests of overseas Indians. Veena is the Director of the Centre for Sustainable Materials Research and Technology (SMaRT@UNSW) - a centre which works with industry in the development of innovative materials and processes and the reduction of energy consumption. Veena also presents on the TV show “New Inventors” - a show that celebrates the inventiveness and resourcefulness of the human mind, and she attempts to get the younger generation, especially girls, interested in Science as a vocation.

http://smart.unsw.edu.au/

Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: UNSW, Randwick, Sydney

Jean Madden

18/7/2011

 
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In 2005, I decided to give all the rough sleepers in Brisbane a swag for Christmas, because I don’t think anyone should have to sleep on concrete or in the dirt. News spread quickly of what I was doing and I have been really busy ever since.


Jean Madden

After realising the negative effects of ‘sleeping rough’, Jean Madden designed the Street Swag made from lightweight waterproofed canvas with a high-density foam mattress that also has room for extra belongings. With school children, prisoners, and Aboriginal communities, Jean and her supporters have now bedded and given a basic shelter to over 16,400 of our homeless. Jean was the first Australian winner of the world’s largest design award, the INDEX: People’s Choice Award and the QLD Young Australian of the Year 2010. Jean’s initiative is about keeping people alive.

http://www.streetswags.org/index.php

Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Sydney Town Hall, Sydney