Dr Sharron Flahive

21/10/2011

 
If you always do what you have always done then you will always get what you have always got.

Dr Sharron Flahive

Over twenty years ago, Sharron’s career as a Team Sports Physician commenced in the traditional heartland of New Zealand’s Polynesian rugby league in Wainuiomata. That was a time when doctors’ involvement in team sport was the preserve of men, forged through long association of family, club or friendship with the coach. However, Sharron was the first of a new breed of specialist Sports Physicians. Her team medical management and rehabilitation skills, aided with some sound pragmatism and humour, converted even her most entrenched critics. Twelve years ago, Sharron was appointed Chief Medical Officer for the NSW Waratahs Super Rugby Team and became the first female Chief Medical Officer of a Super Rugby franchise. Her honest and direct approach is sensitive to the fine line that exists between  doctor/patient confidentiality, the requirements of the player’s physical and emotional state, and the demands of the collective team. Through her pragmatic approach, Sharron has engendered an unqualified level of trust and respect from a generation of Australian professional players and coaches. Professional sports people are exposed to some incredible highs and some equally devastating lows and Sharron, by being involved in the medical care of these athletes, experiences a small part of that which in itself is challenging, exciting and, at times, heartbreaking.

www.nsosmc.com.au
www.sosmc.com.au
www.waratahs.com.au
 Charity: ‘Dress for Success’:  www.dressforsuccess.org/Sydney

Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Sydney Football Stadium, Sydney
 
I am motivated by the challenge of improving the lives of Australian children – the most vulnerable members of our society and our greatest future asset. My current work with Indigenous children highlights the fact that health, education and compassion are the greatest gifts we can provide to address disadvantage.

Professor Elizabeth Elliott AM

Elizabeth is a paediatrician at the Children’s Hospital at Westmead, dedicated to enhancing child health and wellbeing through clinical care, research, education and advocacy. She is Professor of Paediatrics at the University of Sydney and Founder/Director of the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit, which facilitates research on rare, debilitating childhood diseases, and instigated development of a national plan for rare diseases. She is Chief Investigator for the Lililwan Project –to address fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) in the remote Fitzroy Valley in the Kimberley, WA. She holds a prestigious Practitioner Fellowship from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia. Since 2005 Elizabeth has run education workshops for clinicians in remote Dien Bien Province in Vietnam to address high maternal and child mortality. She attended the Prime Ministers 2020 summit, was twice a NSW finalist in the Telstra Business Woman of the Year awards and in 2008 received an AM for service to paediatrics and child health. Community contributions include to the SMILE Foundation, Cure Kids Australia, Steve Waugh Foundation, Women’s College (University of Sydney), SCEGGS Darlinghurst, NSW Guides and the Hoc Mai Australia Vietnam Medical Foundation. 

www.apsu.org.au
www.thewomenscollege.com.au
www.girlguides-nswact.org.au
www.smilefoundation.com.au
www.sceggs.nsw.edu.au
www.georgeinstitute.org.au/marulu
www.nhmrc.gov.au
www.chw.edu.au
http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/hocmai/

Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: The University of Sydney

Rosa Alpert

11/10/2011

 
I chose this charitable activity because deafness is the easiest disability to fix. Call me an opportunist, I found the easier cause to help.

Rosa Alpert

Rosa founded the charity organisation, The Sound World, to raise money to provide Cochlear implants for deaf children in the developing countries where this help is not provided by the government. Her organisation also puts pressure on governments and educational authorities to provide a proper framework for much needed cochlear implants, post-operative care, rehabilitation and educational development. It started in 2007, with two children in Russia and now continues to Armenia with future plans of Afganistan and Palestinian Authority. The Sound World is the Australian charity with unique activities of providing ongoing post surgery rehabilitation to help children with hearing disabilities to integrate into their new sound world.

http://www.thesoundworld.org/

Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Sydney

Caroline Kelly

23/8/2011

 
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Forty or fifty years ago, someone diagnosed with pancreatic cancer would most likely face death within months. Shockingly, in spite of all the advances by mankind, that is still the case in 2011. Too many lives have been lost to this disease and I want to do all that I can to help change that and give hope to those battling it.

Caroline Kelly

In the months after her husband’s diagnosis with pancreatic cancer, Caroline and Avner co-founded a fund to make a difference to those affected by one of the most lethal cancers. Sadly Avner, like 95% of patients diagnosed with this disease succumbed to it months later, a statistic that hasn’t really improved in the last 50 years. Caroline and her two co-directors, have continued to lead the foundation, passionately focused on improving the statistics and outcomes for patients. More than $1.7 million has been raised through charity walks and dinners, and through the support of companies such as Woolworths, Coca-Cola Amatil and Wellcom, as well as countless individuals and volunteers. This money has already funded a trial, is funding cutting edge research into sequencing the genes of pancreatic cancer and the next initiative is for a pilot into providing home nursing in the final nights of a patient’s life in their home. Caroline works full-time running the foundation in hope of improving the statistics for future generations.

http://www.avnersfund.org.au/

Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Sydney

Lisa Champion

7/8/2011

 
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 I have been blessed with the resources to create a foundation through which people working in the fitness industry can reach out to Australians in need.  With age, my empathic muscles have grown far more greatly than my biceps (thankfully!), making me highly motivated to encourage enthusiastic and passionate fitness professionals to reach out so that people in need can benefit from the power of exercise. I feel inspired every day to champion the cause of Fit for Good – and am extremely proud of the way our industry is reaching out with kindness and generosity of spirit.

Lisa Champion

Walking early one morning with her husband, Lisa talked about wanting somehow to bring more compassion to the fitness industry, an industry they have been a part of for decades. After learning the ins and outs of non-profits, Lisa founded Fit for Good, the fitness industry’s charitable foundation, in 2011 with the goal of enhancing the lives of Australians in need through health and fitness opportunities.  Working with community service organisations, Fit for Good offers gym memberships, exercise footwear and clothing, personal training, group exercise, healthy lifestyle and motivational talks and scholarships to those who have been effected by homelessness, drug and alcohol addictions, mental health problems, long term unemployment or other hardship. Lisa and her team connect volunteer fitness professionals who give their time to inspire those less fortunate to take up exercise and adopt healthier lifestyles. Exercise can be a powerful tool in the fight against depression and anxiety, it can help people feel empowered, it raises energy levels and serves as a fantastic mood booster. Fit for Good is the first foundation of its kind in Australia.

http://www.fitforgood.org.au/

Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Sydney

Deborah Nicholas

25/7/2011

 
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Working with Aboriginal mothers and babies makes me feel proud to be part of an important journey of righting some wrongs and closing the gap of disparity between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. The rewards of watching children grow up happy and healthy are worth all the hard work 10 times over.


Deborah Nicholas

Awarded NSW Midwife of the Year, Deborah works within the Aborignal community, caring for babies from pregnancy through their first eight years of life. Because of the complex social and economic disadvantages effecting Aboriginal families, Deborah finds it essential to work in a holistic manner - often going beyond the usual scope of midwifery practice. She supports women through motivational counselling, advocates for and provides referral for community assistance with housing, domestic violence, drug and alcohol counseling, and community support services. She believes a loving relationship between a mother and her child has beneficial impacts on the family and community for generations, and a positive and loving infancy establishes an individual’s resilience and general wellbeing from infancy to adulthood.



Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Forster, NSW

Di Westaway

25/7/2011

 
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I founded Wild Women On Top to empower women to achieve extraordinary goals AND change lives. I believe we should live our dreams and that positive thinking is the basis of a happy life. I have spent the last 10 years working with women in teams and I’ve learned that Together Everyone Achieves More. I believe in doing interesting things with interesting people and adding value.


Di Westaway

Di is passionate about women’s health and her team has raised nearly a million dollars for The Fred Hollows Foundation through the Wild Women On Top Sydney Coastrek. She seeks to empower women to achieve extraordinary goals and follow their dreams. Di founded Wild Women on Top to encourage and promote leadership skills in women by providing opportunities for team building and personal development. Her teams travel to amazing places, accomplish incredible things with like minded professional women and have the opportunity to fulfill humanitarian goals. They combine extreme adventure challenges with fundraising for The Fred Hollows Foundation and The Australian Himalayan Foundation. She has been a physical educator for over 30 years, and a trekker and mountain climber for ten. Di is a former Australian Gymnastics, Aerobics and Masters bouldering champion, has worked in many fields including teacher training, journalism and public speaking, and is a member of the Wild Women On Top Seven Summits team, a keen rock climber and a mother of three.


http://www.wildwomenontop.com/


Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Shelly Beach Cliffs, Manly, Sydney

Trish Lowe

20/7/2011

 
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I look on with admiration and joy at the provision of such unconditional love that I witness with every shift.

Trish Lowe

Trish works within the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, where the most vulnerable of human beings, newborns, arrive in crisis, battling to stay alive. She and the team care for infants ranging in age from 24-42 weeks gestation, who require intensive care and ongoing stabilisation and recuperation. On any given day her role extends from resuscitation of an infant due to deterioration, then stabilisation with respiratory support, intravenous fluids and medications, right through to solving a breast feeding problem for a mother, whose infant is now well enough to feed. Over time Trish establishes close bonds with the families and babies in her care, as they return post discharge for ongoing growth and development assessments. She also supports families through the grief of losing an infant and provides sensitive care which is vital, in order to help them form positive memories and process that event in some meaningful way. Trish witnesses what it means to love unconditionally, as parents grieve losses and celebrate successes, with no expectation of reciprocation.

http://www.rhwfoundation.com.au/

Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Sydney

Karen Johnston

18/7/2011

 
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 Cure is not enough - I would like children who are diagnosed with cancer not just to survive but reach their full potential, and lead the lives they deserve free of impairment.

Karen Johnston
 
Karen works with children, adolescents and adults who have survived cancer diagnosed in childhood. She runs long term follow-up clinics - monitoring growth, learning issues, fertility, and other possible late side-effects of cancer treatments. The children themselves often do not fully understand their original disease as many were very young at diagnosis. It is important to empower them to advocate for themselves when navigating society, the workplace and even with their health practitioners. Karen focuses on maintaining their good health and promoting a well-balanced, fully-developed lifestyle.

http://www.kids-cancer.org/


Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Sydney Children's Hospital, Sydney

Jan Hatch

18/7/2011

 
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 I accompanied a very special friend during the last hours of her life when she
died of pancreatic cancer in 1985. It was a life changing experience for me
and for years I have wanted to use that experience to help others. Working as
a volunteer mentor with LifeCircle has finally made that possible.

Jan Hatch

Certain topics of conversation are difficult to broach. In Western culture dying and death are among the most distressing. Though discussing important issues with a loved one who is dying is not an easy task, it is essential for everyone involved. Jan, as a volunteer mentor at LifeCircle and a member of the Board of Directors, supports people through this very difficult and emotional time. As a mentor, she contacts the family regularly, offering information, understanding and guidance. Jan focuses on the process and realities of caring for a loved one who is dying to help the person dying, their carer, family and friends to make the most of their final weeks and days together. The broader goal of LifeCircle is to enable all of us to experience dying as a natural part of life; to help us understand the importance of living right up to the moment of death; and to facilitate the conversations we all need to have with our loved ones and our communities about how and where we wish to die.

http://www.lifecircle.org.au/


Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Sydney