Tara Winkler

5/9/2011

 
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To be able to make a difference in the lives of such vulnerable, innocent children, to make the world a safer place for them to grow up in - has made my life richer and deeper in so many ways. It makes me strive to be the best person I can be.

Tara Winkler

Tara was in her early twenties and working as a volunteer in Cambodia when she heard about a corrupt orphanage where children were suffering from severe neglect and shocking abuse. Tara assembled a team and took action - rescuing 14 children from the orphanage and creating the Cambodian Children’s Trust (CCT). CCT is now home to 50 children, helping them overcome their backgrounds of abuse and nelgect, breaking the cycle of poverty through care and education. Tara resides in Cambodia and speaks fluent Khmer, and the Trust she founded also supports families in the Battambang region, street children, people with HIV/AIDS, sex workers, victims of landmines, the physically and mentally disabled, and others who are in need. Tara plans to purchase land to build on, so that CCT has a permanent base to provide children with the security they need. Rather than one large institution, the preferred model is one in which small groups (from eight-ten children) are cared for in individual homes by a house mother and father, creating an atmosphere of a typical Cambodian family. CCT has also opened a shop in Battambang to help support its activities and ABC’s Australian Story has produced a story on Tara and CCT. In 2011, Tara was named NSW Young Australian of the Year.


http://www.cambodianchildrenstrust.org/


Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Sydney

Lisa Champion

7/8/2011

 
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 I have been blessed with the resources to create a foundation through which people working in the fitness industry can reach out to Australians in need.  With age, my empathic muscles have grown far more greatly than my biceps (thankfully!), making me highly motivated to encourage enthusiastic and passionate fitness professionals to reach out so that people in need can benefit from the power of exercise. I feel inspired every day to champion the cause of Fit for Good – and am extremely proud of the way our industry is reaching out with kindness and generosity of spirit.

Lisa Champion

Walking early one morning with her husband, Lisa talked about wanting somehow to bring more compassion to the fitness industry, an industry they have been a part of for decades. After learning the ins and outs of non-profits, Lisa founded Fit for Good, the fitness industry’s charitable foundation, in 2011 with the goal of enhancing the lives of Australians in need through health and fitness opportunities.  Working with community service organisations, Fit for Good offers gym memberships, exercise footwear and clothing, personal training, group exercise, healthy lifestyle and motivational talks and scholarships to those who have been effected by homelessness, drug and alcohol addictions, mental health problems, long term unemployment or other hardship. Lisa and her team connect volunteer fitness professionals who give their time to inspire those less fortunate to take up exercise and adopt healthier lifestyles. Exercise can be a powerful tool in the fight against depression and anxiety, it can help people feel empowered, it raises energy levels and serves as a fantastic mood booster. Fit for Good is the first foundation of its kind in Australia.

http://www.fitforgood.org.au/

Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Sydney

Deborah Nicholas

25/7/2011

 
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Working with Aboriginal mothers and babies makes me feel proud to be part of an important journey of righting some wrongs and closing the gap of disparity between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. The rewards of watching children grow up happy and healthy are worth all the hard work 10 times over.


Deborah Nicholas

Awarded NSW Midwife of the Year, Deborah works within the Aborignal community, caring for babies from pregnancy through their first eight years of life. Because of the complex social and economic disadvantages effecting Aboriginal families, Deborah finds it essential to work in a holistic manner - often going beyond the usual scope of midwifery practice. She supports women through motivational counselling, advocates for and provides referral for community assistance with housing, domestic violence, drug and alcohol counseling, and community support services. She believes a loving relationship between a mother and her child has beneficial impacts on the family and community for generations, and a positive and loving infancy establishes an individual’s resilience and general wellbeing from infancy to adulthood.



Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Forster, NSW

Trish Lowe

20/7/2011

 
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I look on with admiration and joy at the provision of such unconditional love that I witness with every shift.

Trish Lowe

Trish works within the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, where the most vulnerable of human beings, newborns, arrive in crisis, battling to stay alive. She and the team care for infants ranging in age from 24-42 weeks gestation, who require intensive care and ongoing stabilisation and recuperation. On any given day her role extends from resuscitation of an infant due to deterioration, then stabilisation with respiratory support, intravenous fluids and medications, right through to solving a breast feeding problem for a mother, whose infant is now well enough to feed. Over time Trish establishes close bonds with the families and babies in her care, as they return post discharge for ongoing growth and development assessments. She also supports families through the grief of losing an infant and provides sensitive care which is vital, in order to help them form positive memories and process that event in some meaningful way. Trish witnesses what it means to love unconditionally, as parents grieve losses and celebrate successes, with no expectation of reciprocation.

http://www.rhwfoundation.com.au/

Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Sydney

Kerri-Ann Nattrass

20/7/2011

 
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 I basically love my job and want the kids to know that someone out there in this world gives a crap about them and wants to help them succeed throughout their tough adolescent years.

Kerri-Ann Nattrass

Making contact with homeless and at-risk young people on the streets to let them know someone cares is just part of what Kerri-Ann does to help break the cycle of crime, abuse and poverty for those who are entrenched in homelessness, prostitution and drug addiction. Kerri-Ann will keep an eye on where they are living, help them look for a job, help write their CV, guide them through their interview process, and drive them to and from work for the first week - no matter what the hour may be - to establish a routine and to install confidence within themselves. These simple steps help long term unemployed young people build skills, overcome fears, and broaden their perceptions of what they can achieve.

http://salvos.org.au/


Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location, Redfern, Sydney

Joy Barrett

18/7/2011

 
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I have spent most of my working life in not for profit organisations. Commercial objectives would never have been enough for me. I have always wanted my work to make a difference, to make the world a better place for people who are disadvantaged and  need someone to speak on their behalf.

Joy Barrett

Adults with severe intellectual disabilities need lifelong assistance in coping with daily tasks, and their carers need support and assistance, to ensure that a relatively good quality of life can be a possibility for all. Joy is the manager of Minimbah, a facility that provides day programs for adults with high support needs, in a caring environment, as well as providing specialist services and building community understanding of their needs and aspirations. Joy fundamentally believes that the care and support of adults with disabilities is the responsibility of the entire community and that this support should be based on entitlements rather than emergency response. Each community member, whatever their disabilities, is valuable and important.

http://www.minimbah.org.au/

Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Sydney