Dr Sharron Flahive

22/10/2011

 
If you always do what you have always done then you will always get what you have always got.

Dr Sharron Flahive

Over twenty years ago, Sharron’s career as a Team Sports Physician commenced in the traditional heartland of New Zealand’s Polynesian rugby league in Wainuiomata. That was a time when doctors’ involvement in team sport was the preserve of men, forged through long association of family, club or friendship with the coach. However, Sharron was the first of a new breed of specialist Sports Physicians. Her team medical management and rehabilitation skills, aided with some sound pragmatism and humour, converted even her most entrenched critics. Twelve years ago, Sharron was appointed Chief Medical Officer for the NSW Waratahs Super Rugby Team and became the first female Chief Medical Officer of a Super Rugby franchise. Her honest and direct approach is sensitive to the fine line that exists between  doctor/patient confidentiality, the requirements of the player’s physical and emotional state, and the demands of the collective team. Through her pragmatic approach, Sharron has engendered an unqualified level of trust and respect from a generation of Australian professional players and coaches. Professional sports people are exposed to some incredible highs and some equally devastating lows and Sharron, by being involved in the medical care of these athletes, experiences a small part of that which in itself is challenging, exciting and, at times, heartbreaking.

www.nsosmc.com.au
www.sosmc.com.au
www.waratahs.com.au
 Charity: ‘Dress for Success’:  www.dressforsuccess.org/Sydney

Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Sydney Football Stadium, Sydney
 
 
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 I have been blessed with the resources to create a foundation through which people working in the fitness industry can reach out to Australians in need.  With age, my empathic muscles have grown far more greatly than my biceps (thankfully!), making me highly motivated to encourage enthusiastic and passionate fitness professionals to reach out so that people in need can benefit from the power of exercise. I feel inspired every day to champion the cause of Fit for Good – and am extremely proud of the way our industry is reaching out with kindness and generosity of spirit.

Lisa Champion

Walking early one morning with her husband, Lisa talked about wanting somehow to bring more compassion to the fitness industry, an industry they have been a part of for decades. After learning the ins and outs of non-profits, Lisa founded Fit for Good, the fitness industry’s charitable foundation, in 2011 with the goal of enhancing the lives of Australians in need through health and fitness opportunities.  Working with community service organisations, Fit for Good offers gym memberships, exercise footwear and clothing, personal training, group exercise, healthy lifestyle and motivational talks and scholarships to those who have been effected by homelessness, drug and alcohol addictions, mental health problems, long term unemployment or other hardship. Lisa and her team connect volunteer fitness professionals who give their time to inspire those less fortunate to take up exercise and adopt healthier lifestyles. Exercise can be a powerful tool in the fight against depression and anxiety, it can help people feel empowered, it raises energy levels and serves as a fantastic mood booster. Fit for Good is the first foundation of its kind in Australia.

http://www.fitforgood.org.au/

Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Sydney
 

Di Westaway

25/07/2011

 
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I founded Wild Women On Top to empower women to achieve extraordinary goals AND change lives. I believe we should live our dreams and that positive thinking is the basis of a happy life. I have spent the last 10 years working with women in teams and I’ve learned that Together Everyone Achieves More. I believe in doing interesting things with interesting people and adding value.


Di Westaway

Di is passionate about women’s health and her team has raised nearly a million dollars for The Fred Hollows Foundation through the Wild Women On Top Sydney Coastrek. She seeks to empower women to achieve extraordinary goals and follow their dreams. Di founded Wild Women on Top to encourage and promote leadership skills in women by providing opportunities for team building and personal development. Her teams travel to amazing places, accomplish incredible things with like minded professional women and have the opportunity to fulfill humanitarian goals. They combine extreme adventure challenges with fundraising for The Fred Hollows Foundation and The Australian Himalayan Foundation. She has been a physical educator for over 30 years, and a trekker and mountain climber for ten. Di is a former Australian Gymnastics, Aerobics and Masters bouldering champion, has worked in many fields including teacher training, journalism and public speaking, and is a member of the Wild Women On Top Seven Summits team, a keen rock climber and a mother of three.


http://www.wildwomenontop.com/


Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Shelly Beach Cliffs, Manly, Sydney
 

Margaret Ryan

19/07/2011

 
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 Marching into the Olympic Stadium with my fellow countrymen, representing the best Australian teams and athletes - still to this day - can fill me a sense of  pride and achievement, and of unity, strength and determination. Never doubt the impact the present can have on your future.

Margaret Ryan

A great deal of Margaret’s life has been spent on or around a hockey field.   She first became involved with the Australian team as Manager in 1979 touring to the USA and Canada.   Australia and Margaret missed the Moscow Olympics because of the boycott initiated by US President Jimmy Carter, she later went on to represent Australia at the Women’s Hockey at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles  (pictured here in the official Australian Opening Ceremony dress).   Shortly after her husband’s death in 1999 Margaret carried the Olympic torch, running past her 90 year old mother. She watched on as the Women’s Hockey Team beat Argentina in the 2000 final to win the Gold Medal for Australia.

http://www.hockey.org.au/


Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Sydney
 

Annie Crawford

19/07/2011

 
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 I get such a kick out of watching the pure joy and elation of our people as they cross that finish line, and for me, that is what drives me to keep doing what I am doing. I feel so lucky to meet such amazing people in every single Can Too program – people who inspire me every day and give me faith in the human spirit.

Annie Crawford

Annie has a passion for fitness and running. When she returned home to Sydney after living abroad, she decided that rather than re-entering the paid work force she wanted to do something that would make a difference - to combine her love of running with raising money for a non-profit organisation. Annie created Can Too, a non-profit organisation that professionally trains individuals to run or swim endurance events like half marathons in exchange for an agreement by the individual to raise money for Cure Cancer Australia. Since 2005, Can Too has raised over $7.5 million dollars, providing vital seed funding to support scientists and young researchers with innovative ideas, enabling them to pursue projects that are the most promising in their potential to cure cancer. To date, Annie and Can Too have become Cure Cancer Australia’s biggest fundraiser.

 http://www.cantoo.org.au/


Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Sydney
 

Sophie Smith

18/07/2011

 
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Losing my first-born sons who had fought so bravely to overcome their premature start to life was utterly devastating. When they died I was determined something beautiful would come from their brief lives, keeping their spirits alive and giving hope to others like them. 

Sophie Smith

In 2006 Sophie and her husband, Ash, suffered the tragic loss of their newborn triplets, who died over a three month period following their premature birth.  Two months later Sophie began to train for a half marathon and raise money for the Royal Hospital for Women’s Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in memory of her three sons, Henry, Jasper & Evan. Sophie looked for runners to join her, and ended up with a team of 98 runners who together raised $80,000 for life-saving equipment for premature babies in the hospital’s NICU.  The Royal Hospital for Women Foundation agreed to set up a permanent Trust Fund in Henry, Jasper and Evan’s names and since then Sophie has organised teams in the Sydney half marathon each year to raise much needed funds for this Trust.  In the six years since the triplets’ deaths, 1100 people have run on Sophie’s teams and over $700,000 has been raised.  This money has provided the NICU with ten humidicribs, ten neonatal monitors and two high frequency ventilators - equipment that is vital to the survival of premature babies just like Henry, Jasper & Evan.

http://www.runningforprematurebabies.com 


Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Sydney

 
 
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 The greatest pleasures in life are best shared....and running is one of mine. If I can also raise funds for charities that make a difference in the lives of children at risk.....then every step run is all the more worthwhile.

Jo Davison

Jo prods and pushes, cajoles and cares. What started out simply as a couple of women getting together for an early morning run, has evolved into a sizeable and social fund-raising/running group, made possible through Jo’s dedication and determination. The women benefit from running farther and faster than they ever have because of her efforts. And the payback for Jo comes in the funds raised for charities through the group......thousands of dollars making a difference in the lives of disadvantaged children.

Photographer: Diane Macdonald
Location: Coogee Beach, Sydney